Tag Archives: false advertisting

Under Investigation: “leather” furniture (or is it really leather)?

Are several types of fake or imitation leather furniture being sold deceptively to make customers believe it is made of genuine, 100% leather?

What is Pleather Furniture?

There are various names under which fake or imitation leather furniture is sold, some of which refer to products that may contain small amounts of leather (though not furniture-grade leather).    Some of the more common technical terms used by sellers of these products include “bonded leather,” “bicast,” “bi-cast leather,” “PU Leather,” and “leather match.”

Companies that sell these and other types of fake leather Furniture

There are many businesses that sell authentic and fake leather furniture products, including Wayfair.com, JCPenney, Value City, Jennifer, and Bob’s Discount Furniture, and Bernie & Phyl’s.

What is wrong with Bonded Leather and other similar Fake Leather Products?

Like all imitation products, there are serious quality and durability issues with bonded leather and other fake leather  furniture.  Many consumers have complained that furniture they believed would stand the test of time and have the durability of genuine leather (which can and should last for many years) has instead developed deep cracks, delamination, and tearing (sometimes within a few months after purchase).  Some fake leather furniture products (including bonded leather and bicast leather) may be sold using deceptive advertising and marketing. Some consumers have been led to believe they are purchasing genuine leather furniture, when in fact that is not the case.

"Pleather" Sofa

“Pleather” Sofa

What can you do if you were deceived into buying furniture that was not real leather?

If you believe you may have purchased fake leather furniture based on deceptive advertising or marketing, you are welcome to contact us. Even if the advertising or promotional material refers to the product by its actual name, such as “bonded leather,” this does not necessarily mean that the advertising and product description may not have been deceptive.

Related information

There is a detailed blog post published by FOW Furniture in New Jersey that explains the true nature of many so-called “leather” products: A Look at the Bi-Cast Leather Controversy.

 

 

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